New BINTEL Deimos Semi-APO refractor now available!

We’ve received the first stocks of the new BINTEL Deimos 72mm semi-APO refractor telescope. (The 80mm Ganymede version telescopes are arriving mid July)

It’s been tricky getting many telescopes recently as quite a few would know and we’re very happy we’ve been able to secure these.  We’d hoped to have them a couple of months ago but at least they’re here now. 🙂 

This is one of the highest quality, small refractors we’ve seen for a long time. 

The basic specifications are:

  • 72mm semi-APO ED multi-coated glass doublet lens
  • Focal length 432mm
  • f/6 Focal ratio
  • Weight 2.5kg
  • Dual speed, high quality rack and pinion focuser 
  • Standard photographic tripod ¼” mounting holes
  • Narrow dovetail mounting rail
  • Solid, CNC machine aluminium construction through
  • Black, gloss anodised finished
  • Aluminium carry carry with foam lining 

Our impressions when handling this little telescope is just how solid and remarkable well built it is.  We’ve found views through it crisp and sharp. Initial images taken with the Deimos telescope show enormous promise. 

The Deimos and its larger 80mm Ganymede sibling are certainly telescopes to consider if you’ve been looking at the popular Sky-Watcher 72ED refractor or the Sky-Watcher Evoluxe models – the release of which seems to have slipped to well into late 2022 at this point. 

Please note that no diagonal or eyepieces are included with the Deimos telescope.  Check out the link below – 

 

 

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