New Celestron Products Announced at NEAF 2018

As you may have heard, there have been a few product announcements at NEAF this year and as your Australian authorised dealer for Celestron – you can bet we’ve got some coming your way!

So here are the new things …

Celestron NexYZ 3-axis Smartphone Adapter

NexYZ fits any eyepiece from 30 mm to 60 mm in diameter including telescopes with 1.25” and 2” eyepieces, spotting scopes, monoculars, and binoculars. NexYZ will also attach to microscopes with the addition of the included microscope adapter ring, which takes the usable diameter down to 25 mm, the size of a standard microscope eyepiece. A strong spring and a threaded twist lock provide a two-level strong and secure grip on the optical instrument’s eyepiece so you can image with confidence.

NexYZ also accommodates a huge range of smartphones. The phone platform is fully adjustable and can fit any device—usually with the case still on. Even larger “phablets” like the iPhone 8 Plus and latest Samsung Galaxy devices work perfectly. The secure platform stands up to the weight of these heavier devices with ease.

More details via Celestron.com

 

0.7x Reducer Lens for Celestron 9.25″ Edge HD

  • The EdgeHD .7x Focal Reducer Lens makes your EdgeHD 9.25″ one full F-Stop faster than f/10, reducing your exposure time by half to capture the same brightness of object
  • 4-element lens design
  • Maintains similar flat-field performance as native EdgeHD optical design
  • Increases field of view by 43% to better capture wide field images
  • Threads directly onto the 3.25″ threads of the EdgeHD which reduces mechanical vignetting and allows for use with larger (full frame) sensors and Off-Axis Guiders
  • Maintains the identical back focus when used at f/10 and provides generous back focus to accommodate additional accessories and wide variety of cameras
  • Allows use of existing EdgeHD T-Adapters with or without the Reducer Lens

RASA 36 – The F2, 14″ Rowe-Ackermann Astrograph

  • A breakthrough 36 cm aperture, f/2.2 optical system designed for professional applications that require both a wide field of view and resolution, such as space surveillance and other scientific applications
  • 4-element lens group utilizes extra-low dispersion (ED) glass for images free of false color, coma, and field curvature, the Rowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph (RASA) 36 cm is also an excellent choice for advanced astroimaging
  • 60 mm optimized image circle maintains pinpoint stars to the far corners of the largest available sensors
  • Extended spectral range takes advantage of sensor response in the 700-900 nm range, allowing a brighter overall signal to be detected
  • Redesigned focusing system minimizes focus shifting or other unwanted motion of the primary mirror, enabling easy and stable focus

OPTICAL TUBE INFO:
Optical DesignRowe-Ackermann Schmidt Astrograph
Aperture (mm)355.6 mm
Focal Length790 mm
Focal Ratiof/2.2
Central obstruction diameter158 mm (44% of aperture diameter)
Light Gathering Power
(Compared to human eye)
2581X
Resolution (Rayleigh)0.39 arc seconds
Resolution (Dawes)0.36 arc seconds
Image circle60.1 mm Ø, 4.4°
Useable field70 mm Ø, 5.1°, only minimal performance loss at edge of FOV
Wavelength range400 – 900 nm
Spot size< 6.3 μm RMS across FOV
Optical coatingsEnhanced aluminum, XLT multi-coatings used throughout
Off-axis Illumination83% at 30 mm off-axis
Optical window104 mm Ø
Back focus with included camera adapter55 mm
Back focus from top of threaded collar77.5 mm
Optical TubeAluminum
Optical Tube Length42.5″ length, 16″ diameter
FocuserNew focuser design, minimizes focus shift
FinderscopeNot included
Optical Tube Weight75 lbs
Other featuresVentilation fan, dual dovetail mounting bars
Included items48 mm camera adapter, fan battery pack

Keep your eye on the Bintel website for availability and pricing coming very soon.

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